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Posts Tagged ‘Lusitano’

In Hot Spanish Nights, the hero Damian Xeres is a master horseman and a rejoneador — those brave men who fight the fierce Iberian bulls on horseback.  The photo is how I imagined Damian.  Hot huh?

The links are to videos of rejoneadors in action!

http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&VideoID=8251327

Rejoneador and Palomino stallion (most likely Lusitano).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTYWw3f7kx8

Pablo Hermoso

 

 

 

A wall painting unearthed at Knossos in Crete, dating from about 2000 BC, shows male and female acrobats confronting a bull, grabbing its horns as it charges, and vaulting over its back.

The art of bullfighting on horseback, as currently practiced in Portugal, where it is called toureio equestre and in Spain and Mexico, where it is called rejoneo, claims a direct origin to the Iberian Peninsula, having developed from Middle Ages war exercises, particularly the cavalry.

Coridas mixtas are also popular, where a rejoneador and two matadores (or a rejoneador, matador and novillero – the last of which is an apprentice matador) perform.

Bullfighting in Spain traces its origins to 711 A.D. The first bullfight took place in celebration for the crowning of King Alfonso VIII.  In Spain, an estimated one million people each year watch bullfights.

Until King Felipe V, who took exception to the sport) banned the aristocracy from participating, the sport belonged to the nobility. The King believed that aristocrats in bullfights set a bad example to the public.  Commoners enthusiasticlly adopted the sport, but since few could afford horses, took the fight to the ground, confronting the bull on foot, and modern corrida began to take form.

Today’s bullfight is much the same as it has been since about 1726, when Francisco Romero of Ronda, Spain, introduced the estoque (the sword) and the muleta (the small, more easily wielded worsted cape used in the last part of the fight).

During a performance, rejoneadores often ride several horses:

  • A parade horse – physically      attractive and disciplined
  • A horse for the first tercio      (entrance of bull) – very fast and brave.
  • A horse for the second tercio      (banderillas) – fast, agile, and a natural instinct for fooling the bull
  • A horse for the third tercio      (death of bull) – very steady

Bullfighting horses are highly trained to swerve instantly, yet remain calm when charged by a fierce, angry bull.  The must possess an extreme dose of bravura, agility, and obedience.

A  rejoneador’s usual costume consists of a dark waistcoat (usually brown or grey), brown leather chaps and a broad, straight-brimmed hat.

 

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Palomino horses can be found on ancient tapestries, paintings and other artefacts of Europe and Asia and in Chinese and Japanese art over two thousand years old. Royalty and warlords revered these golden horses.

Palomino is a color and not a breed. Breeding a palomino to a palomino does not guarantee a palomino foal.  The offspring can be chestnut or cremello.

These horses vary in shade from pale cream to a rich golden color. The mane and tail is usually white but may be gold and/or have dark hairs. Like chestnuts palomino horses may be affected by the sooty gene, when they display dark dapples. The effect is not unattractive but is nevertheless considered to be “incorrect” when compared with an “ideal” palomino. The coat of many palominos changes shade from cream in the winter to golden in the summer (seasonal palominos).

Pale palominos are sometimes called Isabellas, after Queen Isabella de-Bourbon of Spain, who is much remembered for pawning her jewels to fund Columbus’ voyages to the “New World”. The word Palomino is itself a Spanish surname, derived from a Latin word meaning pale dove. Queen Isabella kept a hundred golden horses (but forbid her commoners to own one!). She did, however send a Palomino stallion and five mares to her Viceroy in Mexico (then called New Spain) to perpetuate the horse in the “New World”. North America palominos originally came from the Spanish settlements, presumably descendants of Queen Isabella’s horses.

Genetics of palomino:

Palominoes have a base coat color of chestnut (i.e. of genotype ee, eaea or eea at the extension locus) and genotype C+CCr at the C locus (the cream dilution gene). The CCr allele is semi-dominant and dilutes red pigment to yellow in a single dose (i.e. in palominos). The wild-type C+ allele is effectively recessive since it needs to be homozygous for there to be no dilution of the base color. (Horse Genetics.com)

 The horse in the photos is a Lusitano, which originate in Portugal.

 I personally owned Andalusians, and palomino is not an Andalusian color.

 Andalusians are supporting actors in Hot Spanish Nights, an erotic novella, by Bianca Swan, now available from The Wild Rose Press.  

 Coming May 20th from The Wild Rose Press, Wilder Catalog – CELESTIAL SIN—an angel faces the ultimate temptation and sacrifice.

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Southern Fried Gothic’s Dawn Chartier says:

Like most people who don’t read erotica I think we have this idea that erotica is ALL sex, but if the book is done correctly its not. If it’s written well you will have a strong plot and characters you care for – along with lots of sex. Bianca Swan’s HOT SPANISH NIGHTS has this and more.

 I recommend this book to those who love horses, plenty of sizzling erotic scenes and lovers of HOT SPANISH NIGHTS.

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Not really but bullfighting with Bianca Swan didn’t have much punch.  I decided to post this blog on bullfighting because people interested in Hot Spanish Nights seem to be interested in knowing more about bullfighting.  Check out the videos.  So here goes:

http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&VideoID=8251327

Rejoneador and Palomino stallion (most likely Lusitano).

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTYWw3f7kx8

Pablo Hermoso

A wall painting unearthed at Knossos in Crete, dating from about 2000 BC, shows male and female acrobats confronting a bull, grabbing its horns as it charges, and vaulting over its back.

The art of bullfighting on horseback, as currently practiced in Portugal, where it is called toureio equestre and in Spain and Mexico, where it is called rejoneo, claims a direct origin to the Iberian Peninsula, having developed from Middle Ages war exercises, particularly the cavalry.

Coridas mixtas are also popular, where a rejoneador and two matadores (or a rejoneador, matador and novillero – the last of which is an apprentice matador) perform.

Bullfighting in Spain traces its origins to 711 A.D. The first bullfight took place in celebration for the crowning of King Alfonso VIII.  In Spain, an estimated one million people each year watch bullfights.

Until King Felipe V, who took exception to the sport) banned the aristocracy from participating, the sport belonged to the nobility. The King believed that aristocrats in bullfights set a bad example to the public.  Commoners enthusiasticlly adopted the sport, but since few could afford horses, took the fight to the ground, confronting the bull on foot, and modern corrida began to take form. 

Today’s bullfight is much the same as it has been since about 1726, when Francisco Romero of Ronda, Spain, introduced the estoque (the sword) and the muleta (the small, more easily wielded worsted cape used in the last part of the fight).

During a performance, rejoneadores often ride several horses:

  • A parade horse – physically attractive and disciplined
  • A horse for the first tercio (entrance of bull) – very fast and brave.
  • A horse for the second tercio (banderillas) – fast, agile, and a natural instinct for fooling the bull
  • A horse for the third tercio (death of bull) – very steady

Bullfighting horses are highly trained to swerve instantly, yet remain calm when charged by a fierce, angry bull.  The must possess an extreme dose of bravura, agility, and obedience.

A  rejoneador’s usual costume consists of a dark waistcoat (usually brown or grey), brown leather chaps and a broad, straight-brimmed hat.

Read Full Post »

HOT SPANISH NIGHTS released today from The Wild Rose Press.  http://www.thewildrosepress.com/wilderroses/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=792

I’m having a Release Day Party at The Pink Fuzzy Slippers http://pinkfuzzyslipperwriters.blogspot.com/  Please drop by for fun giveaways, including a download of HOT SPANISH NIGHTS.  There is also a blog on bullfighting since the hero is a rejoneador.

Damian, the hero in HSN, is being interviewed at http://www.tonivsweeney.com/Blog/Blog.html  I’m offering a HSN coffee mug to a random winner who comments with Damian.

I’m excited about HSN.  For years, I bred, trained and showed Andalusian horses, and these beautiful equines are featured in HSN.  I fell instantly in love with Damian because he is a master horseman and a master of other very erotic skills!!  See the trailer.

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